• Index
  • Index A
  • Index B
  • Index C
  • Index D
  • Index E
  • Index F
  • Index G
  • Index H
  • Index I
  • Index J
  • Index K
  • Index L
  • Index M
  • Index N
  • Index O
  • Index P
  • Index Q
  • Index R
  • Index S
  • Index SYMBOL
  • Index T
  • Index U
  • Index V
  • Index W
  • Index X
  • Appendix A. Project Templates
  • A.1 Visual Basic, C#, and J# Projects
  • A.2 Visual C++ Projects
  • A.3 Setup and Deployment
  • A.4 Other Projects
  • A.5 Visual Studio Solutions
  • Appendix B. Project Item Templates
  • B.1 VB.NET, C#, and J# Templates
  • B.10 Binary and Resource Templates
  • B.2 VB.NET Templates
  • B.3 C++ Templates
  • B.4 ATL Templates
  • B.5 MFC Templates
  • B.6 Text-Based Templates
  • B.7 Database
  • B.8 HTML (Web)
  • B.9 XML
  • Appendix C. Shortcut Key Guide
  • Appendix D. Source Control Basics
  • D.1 Creating a VSS Database
  • D.2 Adding a Solution
  • D.3 Files
  • D.4 Checking In and Out
  • D.5 Retrieving a Project
  • D.6 File History
  • D.7 Diffs
  • D.8 Disconnected Operation
  • D.9 Web Projects
  • Appendix E. Solution and Project File Formats
  • E.1 Solution Files
  • E.2 Project Files
  • Appendix F. Text Editor Settings
  • F.1 Global Settings
  • F.2 Generic Settings
  • F.3 VB.NET
  • F.4 C# and J#
  • F.5 C/C++
  • F.6 HTML/XML
  • F.7 CSS
  • F.8 Plain Text and SQL Settings
  • Chapter 1. Solutions and Projects
  • Chapter 10. Visual Studio Integration Program
  • 10.1 Why VSIP?
  • 10.2 Creating Custom Packages
  • 10.3 Conclusion
  • 1.1 Solutions
  • 1.2 Projects
  • 1.3 Solutions, Projects, and Dependencies
  • 1.4 Organizing Your Projects
  • 1.5 Conclusion
  • Chapter 2. Files
  • 2.1 Text Editor
  • 2.2 HTML/XML Editor
  • 2.3 CSS Editor
  • 2.4 Design Views
  • 2.5 Miscellaneous Editors
  • 2.6 Changing Editors
  • 2.7 Custom Build Tools
  • 2.8 Conclusion
  • Chapter 3. Debugging
  • 3.1 Starting the Debugger
  • 3.2 Controlling Execution
  • 3.3 Observing State
  • 3.4 Debugging and Project Settings
  • 3.5 Advanced Debugging Techniques
  • 3.6 Conclusion
  • Chapter 4. Web Projects
  • 4.1 Web Project Templates
  • 4.2 Managed Web Projects
  • 4.3 Visual C++ Projects
  • 4.4 Conclusion
  • Chapter 5. Databases
  • 5.1 Server Explorer
  • 5.10 Conclusion
  • 5.2 Database Diagram Designer
  • 5.3 Table Property Pages
  • 5.4 Table Designer
  • 5.5 Query and View Designer
  • 5.6 SQL Editor
  • 5.7 Database Projects
  • 5.8 Multiuser Issues
  • 5.9 Databases and .NET Projects
  • Chapter 6. Setup and Deployment
  • 6.1 Windows Installer
  • 6.10 Custom Actions
  • 6.11 Launch Conditions
  • 6.12 Cab Files
  • 6.13 Conclusion
  • 6.2 Setup Project Types
  • 6.3 The Installation Process
  • 6.4 Views
  • 6.5 Project Properties and Conditions
  • 6.6 User Interface View
  • 6.7 File System View
  • 6.8 File Types View
  • 6.9 Registry View
  • Chapter 7. Integrating Components with Visual Studio .NET
  • 7.1 Basic Integration
  • 7.2 Simple Integration Attributes
  • 7.3 Custom Property Types
  • 7.4 Custom Component Designers
  • 7.5 Conclusion
  • Chapter 8. Automation, Macros, and Add-ins
  • 8.1 The VS.NET Automation Object Model
  • 8.2 Macros
  • 8.3 Add-ins
  • 8.4 Conclusion
  • Chapter 9. Wizards
  • 9.1 Wizard Basics
  • 9.2 The VS.NET Wizard Engine
  • 9.3 Custom Wizard Engines
  • 9.4 Conclusion
  • Colophon
  • Copyright
  • Preface
  • Audience
  • Conventions
  • How to Contact Us
  • Acknowledgments
  • Table of content
  • Mastering Visual Studio .NET

    Our look is the result of reader comments, our own experimentation, and feedback from distribution channels. Distinctive covers complement our distinctive approach to technical topics, breathing personality and life into potentially dry subjects.

    The animal on the cover of Mastering Visual Studio .NET is an Egyptian goose. It is common everywhere (except deep forests and desert) but is found usually in freshwater and grassy parkland; it feeds on crops and young grass. The Egyptian goose is at home in trees, regularly perching and even roosting there; cavities and holes in trees and abandoned nests of other birds may be selected to nest in.

    Both sexes look alike, although the female is slightly smaller than the male. Its wing coverts are white with black primaries, and green and brown secondaries; its most distinctive feature is a chestnut-colored bandit's mask. The Egyptian goose draws attention to itself with noisy displays and fierce territorial fighting. Rivals stand or swim, breast to breast, attempting to seize each other's backs near the base of the neck while beating with their wings.

    Sarah Sherman was the production editor and proofreader, and Norma Emory was the copyeditor for Mastering Visual Studio .NET. Jane Ellin and Claire Cloutier provided quality control. John Bickelhaupt wrote the index.

    Emma Colby designed the cover of this book, based on a series design by Edie Freedman. The cover image is a 19th-century engraving from the Dover Pictorial Archive. Emma Colby produced the cover layout with QuarkXPress 4.1 using Adobe"s ITC Garamond font.

    Bret Kerr designed the interior layout, based on a series design by David Futato. This book was converted by Joe Wizda to FrameMaker 5.5.6 with a format conversion tool created by Erik Ray, Jason McIntosh, Neil Walls, and Mike Sierra that uses Perl and XML technologies. The text font is Linotype Birka; the heading font is Adobe Myriad Condensed; and the code font is LucasFont"s TheSans Mono Condensed. The illustrations that appear in the book were produced by Robert Romano and Jessamyn Read using Macromedia FreeHand 9 and Adobe Photoshop 6. The tip and warning icons were drawn by Christopher Bing. This colophon was written by Sarah Sherman.

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